Tag Archives: Genesis 24-25

January 8, 2018 Bible Study — Why Did Abraham Want Isaac to Marry a Woman From His Homeland, But Not, Under Any Condition, Move There?

I am using the daily Bible reading schedule from “The Bible.net” for my daily Bible reading.

Today, I am reading and commenting on Genesis 24-25.

    When it was time for Isaac to marry, Abraham emphatically did not want him to marry a Canaanite woman. Abraham asked his servant to return to his (Abraham’s) homeland and find a wife there among his relatives. The servant asked what he should do if the woman was unwilling to return to the land of Canaan, should he take Isaac to Abraham’s homeland? Abraham was even more emphatic that Isaac should on no account go to Abraham’s homeland. This exchange reminds me of the fact that Abraham’s father started out from his homeland heading for the land of Canaan. There was something about the culture of Abraham’s homeland that made him want Isaac’s wife to come from there, but did not want his son to go there. One further piece of the puzzle shows up in the response of Rebekah’s brother and father to the story Abraham’s servant told them explaining why he was there. They agreed to send Rebekah to be Isaac’s wife because they acknowledged that God had clearly directed Abraham’s servant to her. They clearly honored and worshiped the same God as Abraham, yet we know that years later when Jacob came to stay with Laban, the latter no longer worshiped God as his god.

January 8, 2017 Bible Study — Who Do We Marry and Where Do We Live

I am using the daily Bible reading schedule from “The Bible.net” for my daily Bible reading.

Today, I am reading and commenting on Genesis 24-25.

    I find it interesting that Abraham was vehement that Isaac should not return to the land of his ancestors. Especially in light of the fact that Abraham’s father had moved away from there. I think we often overlook the fact that Rebekah’s grandfather, Abraham’s brother, did not leave Ur with Abraham and their father. This story tells us there was something about the people and culture whom Abraham had left behind which he valued, but there was also something which he felt from which it was important to separate himself and his children. When I think about this I reach the following conclusion. Abraham found something lacking in the culture of those around him, something which Isaac would have been influenced by if his wife was one of them. He, also, found something lacking in the culture of the land of his ancestors, something Isaac would only be influenced by if he lived among them. Abraham wanted Isaac to have a wife who shared his values, but did not want him to live among those who preached those values but did not live them (my interpretation of Laban).

January 8, 2016 Bible Study

Starting on New Year’s Day (well, technically, on New Year’s Ever), I switched from using One Year Bible Online for my daily Bible reading to the daily Bible reading schedule from “The Bible.net”.

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Today, I am reading and commenting on Genesis 24-25.

    As I was reading this today, I was struck by the fact that, while Abraham wanted Isaac to marry a woman from among his relatives, he emphatically did not want Isaac to visit them. There is little in the passage to explain his reasons. It is even interesting how it came about that Abraham expressed this. When his servant asked him if he should take Isaac there to live if none of the young women were willing to travel to Canaan, Abraham not only told him no to that, but he told him to never take Isaac there. It reads to me that Abraham was afraid that if Isaac visited his relatives, Isaac would never want to return to Canaan. I think that this points up something we often overlook. Abraham’s father, Terah, had begun moving to the land of Canaan, but settled down before he got there. This passage suggests to me that God had spoken to Terah, just as He did to Abraham, but something about Haran caused Terah to not continue. Perhaps Abraham feared that if Isaac went to Haran, he would be seduced by the same thing which kept his father there.

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    The story of Esau selling his birthright is a classic example of allowing the desire for instant gratification to overcome our long term best interest. Esau was hungry, Jacob had food. Esau traded away his birthright, which had many long term benefits for him for a quick bowl of soup. He came to regret doing so. We need to be careful not to make the same mistake.